Two new business incubators coming to ensley and huffman (birmingham lawyer, home) – alabama (al) – city-data forum

Ultimately, the nature of some serial entrepreneurs are to sell their businesses. However, an economic ecosystem that encourages and sustains the entrepreneurial and startup business clusters will yield great results for the Birmingham region. Like Austin, Birmingham could produce multiple business startups that will wind up becoming Fortune 500s that want to grow locally and remain HQ’d here. This will yield more local philanthropy which leads to more angel investors and capital investment for the area’s startups.

More individuals like Guster will be emerging in the coming years as the ecosystem picks up steam and robust momentum. I’m just personally glad that someone of this generation is carrying the torch in the legacy of A.G. Gaston for encourage of minority entrepreneurial sentiments and business incubator spaces across the City.


The City is doing their part with coming up with an assessment of what they can do to encourage more minority-owned and women-owned businesses as they are encouraging other businesses startups.

Ultimately, the nature of some serial entrepreneurs are to sell their businesses. However, an economic ecosystem that encourages and sustains the entrepreneurial and startup business clusters will yield great results for the Birmingham region. Like Austin, Birmingham could produce multiple business startups that will wind up becoming Fortune 500s that want to grow locally and remain HQ’d here.[/b] This will yield more local philanthropy which leads to more angel investors and capital investment for the area’s startups.

More individuals like Guster will be emerging in the coming years as the ecosystem picks up steam and robust momentum. I’m just personally glad that someone of this generation is carrying the torch in the legacy of A.G. Gaston for encourage of minority entrepreneurial sentiments and business incubator spaces across the City. The City is doing their part with coming up with an assessment of what they can do to encourage more minority-owned and women-owned businesses as they are encouraging other businesses startups.

I get your sentiments, but those embolden statements are more longitudinal stance rather than immediate impacts. Nothing in Bessemer was even a part of that equation. Business incubators are necessary for city’s become hubs of attractive the young, educated, and talented professional class. The building of an economic ecosystem that is business-friendly to startups are immediate focus. Nobody expects a Fortune 500 to form overnight these days. Most businesses of that level are operates on the economies-of-scale model, which is the result of the merger-acquisitions of recent years. I was using that example as proof of saying if more movement such as that occurs then it will gain momentum across the region.

The likelihood of Birmingham becoming a megacity occurring within our lifetime is there but not very high. Nevertheless, Birmingham can position itself to become as prominent as a place like Nashville once again, but nobody wants to emulate Atlanta as we see how ill-prepared it is handle its own problems. Birmingham can become a larger place while remaining within the middle-tier/2-tier range of cities. Realistically, Birmingham will likely hit 2-2.5 million at the most in the long term.

However, nothing is set in stone and can shift for the better or worse depending on the market conditions. There is no guarantee on anything including Atlanta or Nashville being those places to go for that young talent. Cost-of-living, urban landscape, amenity, etc., plays a huge role in those places likelihood of remaining attractive. Birmingham is putting in the measures and work now within its legal powers to increase the likelihood of it becoming a major tech and business startup hub within this portion of the country. The aim is for the City to become a better, more attractive, prominent place for businesses and attraction of young professionals. If Birmingham’s efforts pay off in the long term then it will be fine as a city for those particular groups. However, the sentiments is for Birmingham to aim higher than expected by the naysayers so there can grander and better results in the business realm.

It seems you misunderstood the articles and their content, as well as the content of the post you referenced. The articles and post you referenced are not about Bessemer or comparing it’s economy to that of Austin but about Eric Guster’s law firm that initially opened in Bessemer years ago expanding and now opening business incubators in Birmingham (Which is awesome!). Winding up off base can happen but your assertion was way off base, that being said I don’t think his reference of Austin as a template of growth for Birmingham is far fetched or laughable it seems rather well reasoned. Both are major southern metros, one has an established tech scene and the other has a burgeoning one, both have garnered reputations for being cool urban cities etc. Birmingham would do well to learn from what Austin has been good at.

Also Birmingham already has a Fortune 500 company(not sure if you were aware from the tone of the post it seems you aren’t) and would have more if not for the horrendous recession of 2007, again it’s not so far fetched that what is currently the 10th largest banking center in the country and home to several Fortune 1000 companies can get more Fortune 500 companies at some point.

Finally whatever you think Birmingham is I can assure you quaint and small it is not. I disagree that anyone on this thread was making Birmingham out to be this Alpha class mega city and to that point the only one to mention "mega city" at all was you not another poster and again it’s not just off base but way off base. Not sure where you were going with that one. I also disagree that Birmingham should focus on being small and passive going forward. That is the essence of the small minded negativity of a bygone era that held the city and the region back for decades. Birmingham should absolutely continue to think and work big. Nothing wrong with small metros under a million but that is not B’ham and the region shouldn’t try to regress to that status, just my 2 cents. Despite the disclaimer about progress it seems that you think having more business incubators in Birmingham is not just a bad thing but a very bad thing and will induce residents into claiming to be a mega city or something. I suggest you to take a second look and re think your position. Business incubators are great for communities and are successful at fostering and growing locally owned businesses into very successful and efficient companies. Look no further than B’ham based Shipt that benefited from a business incubator. This is not a cause for concern or negativity (except from trolls obviously) but more evidence that Birmingham is trending more and more in the right direction. I only hope that these incubators have the success as the primary one at Innovation Depot.