Traveling with a rabbit – wabbitwiki

• Wire pet carrier: While these carriers are chew-proof, rabbits may get their legs stuck in the holes, and the open sides may make them feel unsecure. If you use one of these, cover the bottom with a solid surface like a plastic sheet or a towel, and lightly cover the carrier with a bed sheet while continuing to give sufficient ventilation.

• Soft fabric carrier: These carriers are easy to store because they fold but are only suitable for extremely short trips. Rabbits can easily chew through the material and escape if they set their mind to it. However, these can be used if you don’t want to advertise the fact that you have a pet and hidden as a gym bag. Throw a towel over it, and no one will know what is underneath it.

One option is to use a cardboard box.


First lay a towel or blanket on the bottom so your rabbit will not slide around. Place your rabbit’s litterbox and foodbowl inside, and punch a hole in the side for a water bottle. You can hang the water bottle by simply punching holes in the cardboard to run a piece of wire around (be careful to eliminate sharp ends that your rabbit might injure itself on). It will make for a less-messy ride (and car) if you situate the water bottle such that the drinking tube is above where you’ve placed the litter box. You can also use a water bowl, but it tends to spill and then make a mess of the cardboard.

You can either punch holes in the side for airflow and close the top or, if you have a very bold bunny, just leave the top fully or half open. It is vital that you punch enough holes for adequate airflow especially in warm weather as rabbits will easily overheat. You will also need to be careful that your rabbit does not chew his way through the cardboard and escape. Be warned that these cardboard boxes will generally be unable to reused in the case that the rabbit soils it, which is not uncommon.

Another option with a similar setup is a plastic laundry basket with holes in the side. These will provide enough ventilation in the case of warm weather, and you can cover it with a sheet or other light material to discourage an escape by jumping. This is a better alternative as the plastic is much sturdier than cardboard and cannot be easily chewed through.

Give your rabbit a cave- and den-like setting if possible. Generally pairs of rabbits do very well in the car because they have another bunny to cuddle with and take comfort in. Try to drive such that you minimize the jostling of the bunny if you can – no sudden stops, jerky acceleration, or sudden lane changes. Keep the volume on the radio moderate, and the windows mostly closed.

When placing the bunny carrier in the car, make sure that it is secure and as level as possible. The floor behind the passenger seat is the best location and also prevents the entire carrier from sliding. If you place the rabbit on the seat, you can place the seat belt through the handle to secure it in place. [2] Pull the seat belt to the end to lock the seat belt length.

Make sure that your rabbit has access to food (hay, vegetables, pellets) and water for the duration of the car ride if the trip is over an hour. Shorter trips do not require food or water. [2] Another option is to keep cold wet vegetables with the bunnies. Any crocks or food and water containers should be secured to the sides of the cage to prevent movement. Check up on your bunnies every time you pull over to make sure they are not overheating and to swap out their towels and bedding if it has been soiled.