The wrapunzel blog inspire happiness with the art of hair wrapping

Hi beautiful ladies! I’m Cate! I’m from Brooklyn, New York. I’m married to my absolute best friend and love of my life and we have two adorable cats! I’m about to start nursing school – wish me luck! I became religious around 18 and I have a bunch of tattoos (battle scars as my family calls them). I’ve ALWAYS been fascinated with hair covering! Some hobbies are reading, studying (I know I’m weird like that), for suuuuuure playing around with all my scarves, learning anything related to Judaism and anything that will help me grow as an individual

There was this stunning Muslim girl in one of my classes who wore a turban perfectly wrapped and it was so regal I couldn’t help but stare. When I first started wrapping my hair I was in love but I would also get frustrated easily because I’m seriously a perfectionist and this craft definitely takes a lot patience!


Now that it has been quite some time since I’ve started (I think it’s been close to a year), I’m a lot more confident with my techniques and feel a little bit braver to leave my comfort zone and try new styles that I normally would never go for. A memorable moment was the first time a stranger complimented how stunning my wrap was when I was feeling kinda self conscious! I don’t really remember how I found Wrapunzel but a friend recommended I join the community group on Facebook so of course I couldn’t move quick enough!

I have such a weird style that it’s hard to put it into words! A little bit old school, a little minimal but mostly all over the place haha! My wraps are very different and funky but almost basic so I guess that explains me! Do you match your head scarf to your outfit or the other way around? I tooooottally match the outfit based on which scarf I’m in the mood for! What are your favorite colors and styles to wear? I love love love like dusty rose, greys, blues, purples, and earth tones! My favorite styles are probably Shira tails, the Marrakesh turban (a new found love), anything with twists, and a basic turban with angled front!

Covering with scarves has promoted a lot of growth in regards to my love and intentions for the mitzvah of hair covering (with every new style I fall more and more in love with hair covering) which has then led to the increase in confidence and understanding of my position in the world. What are some of the most important hair covering lessons you’ve learned over the years? I’d have to say to take it slow, baby steps. If you overwhelm yourself when you’re not truly ready for something you may resent it and not want any part of it (unfortunately I’ve been there).

I think some cool experiences were things like unexpected people asking me to show them how I did that particular wrap. Or the times when I’ve spotted a fellow wrapper in the wild! I actually have had some amazing realizations since covering and covering with scarves. If you’re a good and mindful person with pure intentions and always kind, it transforms you and the light shines out from within and is displayed across your face which then totttallllyyy enhances the wrap or whatever your choice of hair covering! Also, you shouldn’t (I know it’s really hard) give a damn about what anyone thinks of you! There are always going to be haters and people who make comments or stare but you keep being the queen that you are!

As I am a religious jewish woman I started covering my hair on the day after my wedding. In the beginning I wore small caps with my long hair showing underneath, but I was never happy with it. A friend encouraged me to try out wearing a tichel and that was the beginning of my tichel-journey. I remember the first time I put one on how good it felt. From then on I never had a question anymore if that is the right way for me to cover my hair. In the beginning I put it on only when I left the house. Once my first child grew a bit older and started to ask questions I decided to cover all the time (from the time before my kids get up in the morning till after they have gone to bed). Now, wearing tichels has become so much a part of me and my style that I couldn’t imagine to go without, even if religion wasn’t an issue. I remember the first time I wore a tichel to the office where I worked back then. I came through the door, my boss looked me up and down, gave me a pitiful smile and said: ‘Wow, you really look like a cleaning lady…’ That was not a nice experience. I found Wrapunzel through a nice young woman I met at fundraising dinner for a charity organization for terror victims. We started talking, she commented on how beautiful my tichels were and recommended Wrapunzel to me.

I found out about Wrapunzel in 2015. As a Muslima the scarf and I have a special relationship. I simply love scarves and have way too many of them. I wear them all year round, Summer and Winter, it doesn’t matter, around the neck but also on my head. In the beginning of 2015, I was thinking about wearing the headscarf again. I was looking for a different way to wear it (i.e. not like my granny haha) and started searching on the internet for inspiration.

I learned how you could easily style your scarf, even when your hair is short (in those days my hear was often very short) using shapers and velvet headbands and all other kinds of accessories. But more important than that, I met a lot of ladies from all over the world and found out about a sisterhood, not only in the umma, the Moslim community, but beyond borders and beyond belief.

And that is what I love about the Wrapunzel Fangroup. It is not only scarves, it is beyond scarves. It is about our lives, about our struggles (do I wear the scarf or not) but also about our victories. And most important it is beyond Faith. And in these days of hatred and blaming others I am really glad there is still something like sisterhood.

A little about me-I’ve been wrapping since my wedding almost 2 years ago, and I live near Washington DC with my amazing husband. I met Andrea shortly after I got married through a mutual friend, and have been inspired by her in my wrapping. Some of you may recognize me from the Wrapunzel website (I had an awesome time modeling the midsummer line with Yehudis) and from the fangroup, where I post almost daily. Sometimes I need to see myself through a camera lens to see the outward image I am projecting for the world to see, and what better way to do that than sharing with the amazing and supportive Wrapunzel community.

Everyone has a different definition of what is considered professional. I work for a government agency where all of the men (and some of the women) are in suits every day. Dress pants and blouses and sometimes sheath dresses are present as well. That is what “business professional” standardly looks like. And yes, while I love to rock the sheath dress as much as the next girl (see pics below), that isn’t the be-all, end-all of dressing professionally.

First and foremost, confidence and tidiness are key. Even if you are in a suit, if you don’t hold your head high and your clothing is disheveled, you won’t look professional. And while wearing your tichel proudly, you allow your confidence to shine through. It may take a little practice to get a tichel looking neat and tidy, but master the Beginner’s Luck, the Regal wrap, and maybe a turban if you want and you will never go wrong.

Part of it is the clothing I choose to wear, but tichels play a major part it in. Sometimes I want to do a fancy wrap with multiple scarves and feel creative, and some days I just want a simple Beginner’s Luck with my favorite sari scarf, or a turban with a T-shirt tichel. It all depends on how I feel, but my color choices in both my clothing and my tichels allow me to express myself and show the face I want the world to see.

I think sometimes it’s both, but more often it makes me feel free. I’ve woken up some mornings wanting to wear a particular scarf and decided nothing matched, or had a hard time matching a scarf to an outfit I wanted to wear (in these situations, my husband usually comes to my rescue and suggests some fantastic combination. Don’t be fooled, ladies, some of my best outfits were chosen by him). But most of the time, I love being able to match scarves to outfits, pulling in some small color from my dress, or wearing a neutral outfit and brightly colored scarves. I also believe that accessories pull and outfit together and make it look polished. Tichels are as much an accessory and part of my outfit as makeup, jewelry, shoes, or a jacket, so I love to coordinate whatever bling I’m wearing on my tichel (headband, pin, sash) to the rest of my jewelry

To be completely honest, I’ve been there. I started my job two months before my wedding, and the first day going back to work, I had a really hard time getting dressed. I had been planning on wearing a wide headband, but somehow it just didn’t feel right. My husband was watching this dilemma, and he told me to just wear a scarf. So I chose something neutral and understated (black/white/grey ombre 2in1 with a silver headband), and went to work. The first week, I got a few questions from my supervisor and co- workers, but I was ready with my response: “Some Orthodox Jewish women cover their hair after marriage, and that is what I have chosen to do”. And everyone accepted that. Over the next several weeks, as I became more comfortable, I started branching out with brighter colors and more intricate styles, and no one batted an eyelash. Do I still get funny looks in the bathroom sometimes? Of course.

Do people occasionally ask why I cover my hair? Absolutely. Do random people stop me in the halls? All the time. But when I smile at staring people in the bathroom, they smile back. And I tell the people who ask that I cover my hair to signify my status as an Orthodox Jewish married woman and it is a part of my religion. And the people who stop me in the hallway? They usually just want to tell me they like my scarf, ask how I tied it, or where I got it.