Now the wait begins dodge challenger forum

As for a burnout, unless you have drag radials it isn’t needed as street tires work better cold. Simply drive around the water and burnout box, back up till you’re almost in the damp area and give the tires a quick spin or two (literally only a second or two) to knock the "marbles" off the tires and out of the tread. When I started I kept spinning when I launched until somebody explained it to me.

So here’s the reasoning: when a car with drag radials or slicks does a proper burnout the soft rubber from rear tires melts throw bits molten rubber off the tires, onto and behind the car. Look at the lower fenders and wheel wells when you are walking through the pits. But I digress, when these bits of molten rubber hit the asphalt or concrete they tend to form little balls as they roll and cool off.


Also when a car spins off the line of the tires even slip a bit, theses little rubber balls form. These little balls are called "marbles".

When you approach and drive around the burnout box, you inadvertently drive through a lot of these little guys and because they can be coated with VHT (an adhesive that the track crew sprays from the end of the burnout area to the 60′ timers for additional traction) they tend to stick to you tires. So imagine that your tires are lightly coated with these sticky balls and you floor it. Yup, just like ball bearings! So by giving the tires a quick spin, the friction of the track will clean them off your tires and centrifugal force will throw ’em behind you.

Here’s where you can give the peanut gallery on vulture’s row something to laugh at (and you will until you get used to them…everybody does when they start out) unless you are super careful. Rolling into (actually blocking) the first beam lights up the "pre-staged" light at the very top of the tree. Move forward 18" and you roll into (block) the second beam.

Once the tree starts, usually there is a 1/2 second between each amber (or yellow) light the the green lights up. However if you wait until you see the green light, you’ll be slower that your competition to leave the starting line in a race. If you’re just running in a test and tune session, don’t worry about your reaction time (it gets better with practice), just concentrate on launching your car. P.S. I usually side step the brake once the last yellow light is completely on.

Also as far as throttle control goes, you can start by stomping it then if you are spinning (spinnin’ ain’t winnin’) start slowing your throttle mash down a little at a time until you find that magic speed. Also, don’t try to do it all at one time. As with anything in racing, do ONE THING AT A TIME and learn what is happening before you move on to the next thing. Also keeping a detailed log book of what the weather was (temp humidity, wind, pressure and density altitude) you did and the results will help later when you need a reference.

After you get a good handle on launching, you can start playing with your tuner. I have the intune2 also, so I am familiar with what they can do. First if you haven’t already done so, go ahead and load the tune that you want into the car. Then you can increase the throttle response setting after you are comfortable making passes. I dial mine up to 20 when racing, then back it off to about 12 for daily driving. Be careful though, when the response is maxed the throttle is EXTREMELY TOUCHY and it takes some time to get used to. That’s why I back it down when I’m done.

Another thing, don’t be shy about talking to people in the pits and staging lanes while you’re waiting to run. You’ll find out that 99% of the people there are more than willing to talk about their cars. A a good way to start a conversation is to make a comment about their car and ask then a few general questions about it. After you strike up a conversation, you can start to ask them some questions. Don’t be hesitate to tell the people there that you just getting started. Most folks are more than willing to help and are glad to see new people coming into the sport.

After you get a good handle on launching, you can start playing with your tuner. I have the intune2 also, so I am familiar with what they can do. First if you haven’t already done so, go ahead and load the tune that you want into the car. Then you can increase the throttle response setting after you are comfortable making passes. I dial mine up to 20 when racing, then back it off to about 12 for daily driving. Be careful though, when the response is maxed the throttle is EXTREMELY TOUCHY and it takes some time to get used to. That’s why I back it down when I’m done.

Another thing, don’t be shy about talking to people in the pits and staging lanes while you’re waiting to run. You’ll find out that 99% of the people there are more than willing to talk about their cars. A a good way to start a conversation is to make a comment about their car and ask then a few general questions about it. After you strike up a conversation, you can start to ask them some questions. Don’t be hesitate to tell the people there that you just getting started. Most folks are more than willing to help and are glad to see new people coming into the sport.