Essay best new conservative words – conservapedia

a conservative trait that helps keep inflation low. First usage in courts occurred when the Minnesota Supreme Court struck down a regulation and explained that the improper regulation was too broad and not limited to protection against schemes that deceive a "veteran bargain hunter." Kanne v. Segerstrom Piano Mfg. Co., 118 Minn. 483, 487, 137 N.W. 170, 171 (1912).

in its serious usage, "demonic" refers to actions that seem to be influenced by evil or by Satan himself, such as when someone acts out of character in a wrongful way, or when a group goes in a bad direction, or when random chance takes an unlikely bizarre turn; demonic also explains why some events or activities become more overbearing than they should

Searching through dumpsters for food or other material that can used rather than discarded; first known use: "Restaurant and store owners have complained about drunks panhandling during the day and ‘dumpster diving’ through trash at night." [48] It is also a popular method used by watchdog groups; they rummage through the trash of organizations they consider to be corrupt, hoping to find evidence to use against them (televangelist Robert Tilton’s ministry was brought down in such a manner; thousands of prayer requests — with all the donations removed — were found in the dumpster of his attorney).


a mathematical proof based on the minimum assumptions associated with real analysis; term probably does not predate complex analysis and its first use may have been the English mathematician James Joseph Sylvester’s paper, "On an elementary proof and generalisation of Sir Isaac Newton’s hitherto undenionstrated rule for the discovery of imaginary roots." [53]

may have existed earlier, but popularized in 1924 by Leon Trotsky. Describes a sympathizer of a cause but who does not formally belong to the cause, such as a communist sympathizer who is not part of the communist party. The term was invented by the communists in its original, non-negative sense, but the conservatives were the first to use it as a pejorative term.

"Assuming that this court has power to act, it does not necessarily follow that it should act. … In a number of situations, and in a number of cases, it has been held that courts should voluntarily refrain from using or asserting power. Where the use or assertion of power might be destructive of a well defined purpose of law or of a declared public policy such voluntarily imposed judicial restraint may be commendable." [82]

the deprivation of private property due to a court decision; this concept was introduced by conservative Justice Potter Stewart in 1967, and the term was used for the first time independently by the Michigan and Hawaii Supreme Courts in the same month (!) in December 1982, and then used often in law review articles and Circuit Court decisions in the 2000s, and then four Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court endorsed the principle in a decision in 2010, with two others accepting the possibility.

the power of a jury to overrule the law and acquit an ostensibly guilty defendant; the power was established in the colonies in 1735 in the trial of John Peter Zenger, but this term was first used in state court by Pfeuffer v. Haas, 55 S.W.2d 111 (Tex. Civ. App. 1932) and in federal court by Skidmore v. Baltimore & O. R. Co., 167 F.2d 54 (2nd Cir. 1948)

an undisciplined person or program that dangerously lacks forethought; used in mid-November 1976 to describe $11 billion in unspent appropriations by the Ford Administration: "’That money,’ says Arnold Packer, a senior Senate Budget Committee economist who is helping Carter draw up his shadow budget, ‘is like a loose cannon rolling around the deck’ because a sudden reappearance of the funds could be inflationary." ( BusinessWeek)

William Safire wrote in the New York Times in 1983, "Misandry, from the Greek misandros for ‘hating men,’ is in the 1961 Merriam-Webster New International Dictionary, and the Oxford Dictionary Supplement traces it to 1946. The word is pronounced as ‘Ms. Andry,’ but I wonder why we need the Greek word for it. What’s wrong with good, old-fashioned man-hater?" [91]

Lee Wishing, director of communications for conservative Grove City College, in criticism of how the government administers student loans: "Unfortunately, with government programs, it’s one size fits all." [102] The 2008 Republican platform states, "We reject a one-size-fits-all approach and support parental options, including home schooling, and local innovations such as schools or classes for boys only or for girls only and alternative and innovative school schedules." [103]

a conditioned, automatic and unthinking response to a signal; it has been used twice by conservative Supreme Court Justices. "It is well established that this Court does not, or at least should not, respond in Pavlovian fashion to confessions of error by the Solicitor General." De Marco v. United States, 415 U.S. 449, 451 (1974) ( Rehnquist, J., dissenting); "’ Incorporation’ has become so Pavlovian that my Brother BLACK barely mentions the Fourteenth Amendment in the course of an 11-page opinion dealing with the procedural rule the State of Florida has adopted for cases tried in Florida courts under Florida’s criminal laws." Williams v. Fla., 399 U.S. 78, 144 (1970) ( Stewart, J., dissenting and concurring).

a Christian concept for the benefit of the souls of jurors, not the accused; first used in English by John Adams (before that, in canon law) in addressing the jury during his defense of the Boston Massacre perpetrators: "Where you are doubtful never act: that is, if you doubt of the prisoner’s guilt, never declare him guilty; that is always the rule, especially in cases of life." [118]

• ↑ From Pollard v. Shaaffer, 1 U.S. 210, 213 (1 Dall. 210) (Pa. S.Ct. 1787): "In the case before the court, if the lessee had covenanted for himself and his assigns, to deliver up the tenements in good order and repair, notwithstanding they should be destroyed by act of God or of an Enemy, then this action would certainly lie, because of the special express words; but when there are no such words, but only generally to repair &c. would it be reasonable to construe these words so as to extend to the cases put?"

• ↑ "[T]his is one of those rare cases when the [Oxford English Dictionary] gets something wrong. America, not Britain, deserves credit for inventing the word. Jacob Wagner, a Massachusetts federalist, first used conservative in its modern political sense in a letter dated May 13, 1808." David Lefer, The Founding Conservatives, page 5 (2013).

• ↑ First known use was in an article by Tom Zito, "Mr. Mike’s Mania; Sick Humor, Very Well Indulged," Washington Post F1 (Nov. 8, 1979): "But now, it’s off to La-La land, and his movie deal. ‘The thing about Southern Californians,’ he says, ‘is this: They wake up and say, ‘Gee, what a wonderful morning. I think I’ll make a salad.’ And that takes them the whole day. …"

• ↑ Used by the state attorneys for West Virginia (including Philip Steptoe, founder of Steptoe & Johnson) in Pennsylvania v. West Virginia, 262 U.S. 553 (1923): "It is not the ‘subject of judicial cognizance,’ Hans v. Louisiana, 134 U.S. 1, 15; Louisiana v. Texas, 176 U.S 1, 15; Missouri v. Illinois, 180 U.S. 208, 233, or ‘susceptible of judicial solution.’ Louisiana v. Texas, 176 U.S. 1, 18, 22; Missouri v. Illinois, 180 U.S. 208, 233, 234."

• ↑ Christine Wallace, "Coalition needs a new partner," Australian Financial Review p. 17 (May 15, 1995) ("John Howard’s unforced error in a pre-recorded interview [was] to tell ABC-TV’s Paul Lyneham that things would only be ‘cooking with gas’ if variable mortgage rates began to fall, when precisely that happened in between recording the interview and it going to air, [and this] is a gift to Labor with an election in sight ….")